Diary: Scorpion Project

June 28th, 2015

Click below to hear an audio version.

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She says, “The kids’ science project.”

He says, “It’s been in this jar for days, and we can see it getting smaller, but now I don’t know what to do with it.”

“You can’t release it here,” she says.

I say, “I’ll take it.”

Still in the jar, I transport it home in my car and place the container on an outside shelf near the front door for the night. In the early morning before the sun has risen over the ridge, I ride side by side with the jar along the gravel way. Hair blowing; four-wheeler roaring; I consider where I’m going to release this animal.

So, I carry the creature through the main gate– leaving the farm.

I set it atop a wooden post to photograph the scorpion in a jar.

Thru the prism of Ball brand glass, backlit by sun, the scorpion’s pincers wave and stretch toward the ceiling of its cell.

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I look about—where and how shall I release it. Will it swing and sting or rush and pinch me? Scorpions have such a scary reputation, but its true nature is unknown to me, so I have no idea how it will react when I let it go.

I lay the jar on its side across the lichen spotted boulder. The precise, minuscule second the lid comes off the scorpion scuttles quickly forward and pops out of the jar and crosses the rock and descends into a dark crevasse beyond me. Freedom it knows.

I wasn’t of any interest. How silly to think that I would matter.

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10 thoughts on “Diary: Scorpion Project

  1. My recent up close and personal with nature was a rattlesnake over at Columbia Hills State Park. I was leading a group, some in sandels and flip-flops (both bad ideas) on the walk to see the pictographs and there it was, just about 3 ft. in front of me just to the right of the trail. It started to coil. I said, “Stop!” in what must have sounded authorative as they did stop. Then, I said back up, back up, and they did. The snake went down a hole nearby. As with your scorpion, I knew he had no interest in us, just self-protection and personal safety. Self-centered sort of creature. Also I worked at a Girl Scout camp in West TX on what had been a sheep ranch. Lots of scorpions. Boy, to they look huge by flashlight as a shadow on a platform tent wall or ceiling and then trying to hit them without knocking them onto the bed, into my clothes or shoes in the dark was pretty exciting. I think only one or two people were stung in spite of how many we saw over the several weeks. Hope your scorpion finds some relatives to join up with in a wonderful new life. Can you find Scorpio, the Scorpion, in the night sky? It is one of my favorite sonstellations. Paula

    1. My recent up close and personal with nature was a rattlesnake over at Columbia Hills State Park. I was leading a group, some in sandels and flip-flops (both bad ideas) on the walk to see the pictographs and there it was, just about 3 ft. in front of me just to the right of the trail. It started to coil. I said, “Stop!” in what must have sounded authorative as they did stop. Then, I said back up, back up, and they did. The snake went down a hole nearby. As with your scorpion, I knew he had no interest in us, just self-protection and personal safety. Self-centered sort of creature. Also I worked at a Girl Scout camp in West TX on what had been a sheep ranch. Lots of scorpions. Boy, to they look huge by flashlight as a shadow on a platform tent wall or ceiling and then trying to hit them without knocking them onto the bed, into my clothes or shoes in the dark was pretty exciting. I think only one or two people were stung in spite of how many we saw over the several weeks. Hope your scorpion finds some relatives to join up with in a wonderful new life. Can you find Scorpio, the Scorpion, in the night sky? It is one of my favorite sonstellations. Paula
      Paula- thanks for commenting and your two stories. I am thankful we don’t have rattlesnakes here at the farm, and this mainly because of the dogs. I looked at a property closer to Baker that had a lot of rattlesnakes, and it was a deciding factor in not buying it. Again, because of the dogs. I need to find Scorpio in the sky. Is this a summer constellation? Sher

  2. I see where you took it OFF the ranch – onto someone else’s 🙂

    Is it going to be all by itself out there longing for companionship?

    1. I see where you took it OFF the ranch – onto someone else’s 🙂

      Is it going to be all by itself out there longing for companionship? Dang it Art– I should have mentioned– I put Mr. Scorpion onto right- of – way property — not on my neighbor’s property. 🙂 I think it will find another of its kind under one of the rocks. 🙂 Thanks for commenting! I didn’t realize you were seeing my blog. 🙂

    1. Sher, I would not have let that scorpion out on your property.I would have stopped else where. Hello Mom! Yes, mothers do feel this way. Thank you for the good advice. 🙂 Sher p.s. I released him a LONG ways from the house! 3/4 of a mile away!

  3. Sher, scorpions live under rocks. If you turn over rocks on your place, you may find some. They are not that fast and can’t jump or fly. They do sting. It feels about like a bee sting but does not seem to itch much afterwards. Loved the photos and story.
    Mike

    1. Sher, scorpions live under rocks. If you turn over rocks on your place, you may find some. They are not that fast and can’t jump or fly. They do sting. It feels about like a bee sting but does not seem to itch much afterwards. Loved the photos and story.
      Mike
      Mike- Thanks so much for commenting. I actually did some research about Oregon scorpions before writing this piece, because I did not know we had scorpions in Oregon. And, I found the Oregon version is pretty benign. I guess you must have them there in Idaho. I like to think they are here under the rocks. We have so many rocks–especially in the area of the farm I call the Moonscape. Sher

  4. Nice save! I remember seeing them around my house in Arizona – never had any issues and found them so interesting.

    1. Nice save! I remember seeing them around my house in Arizona – never had any issues and found them so interesting. Thanks Karen–this was my first contact with scorpion. They seem as though they belong to another age– a much earlier one. 🙂 Sher

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