Dream the Rooster

Please select the audio link below to hear an audio version of “Dream the Rooster.”

Rooster_crowing
“Rooster crowing” by Taken byfir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au

 

I hear my far neighbor’s rooster crowing when I tramp out to feed the birds in the morning. On a day like today when it’s icy and snow layers the ground, the cock’s crow carries like a siren over the prairie and sounds so close, the big boy could be strutting underfoot and weaving around me.

 

I’ve been listening to this rooster each morning and off and on throughout the day for about a year. I have never seen the bird, and I can only guess which farm he lives on.

 

I want a rooster too; I wish to hear my own bird marking his time, and to see my dandy strutting and hurrying the hens as males so well do.

 

On any given day a rooster passes through my mind. Recently I conjured a rather small fellow sporting black and white feather-leggings and a mop hat covering his comb. Some varieties of chickens do resemble this delightful two-tone fop! Not all roosters have the striking red comb that stands high on their head. My imagined paramour is probably better at parading, posturing, and displaying than actually mating though.

 

Another rooster I daydream about is a living sunset that never goes down. A great red comb and wattles herald his rich mellifluous voice spreading golden light across the farm. His feathers are graduated in varying tones of orange and brown, and he has a glossy black tail. He’s bold and utterly bewitching, and probably the one who– when he reaches adulthood– will have to have his head cut off because he has become too aggressive.

 

But, the sage whispers, isn’t it enough, my friend, to hear your neighbor’s cock’s crow? To hear its charming accord again and again as the sound reminds you of tall grasses thrusting above deep snow. The cock’s crow and the land. Remember last week when you took your walk; you heard the cock-a-doodle-doo in the distance, and you looked down to see wild turkey tracks in ice. The turkeys were on their way to stands of white oaks, where their dinosaur-feet would swipe back snow and wet leaves so the odd-shaped birds could search for fallen acorns. The rooster crowed again, and you noticed an elk track traversing the turkey prints back and forth, back and forth– braiding the turkeys’ trail.

 

Isn’t it enough to dream the rooster?

 

(Captions for each photo will be revealed when you roll cursor over  image.)

 

4 thoughts on “Dream the Rooster

    1. I love this whimsical, wistful piece! I’m betting that Mule Springs will have a flock of chickens in the near future….. Hi Mary– Thanks. Well, it has been interesting to read people’s responses to this piece. I wanted to see if folks would get the meaning I had intended for the writing…but so far no one has. Doesn’t matter at all to me as my intentions are what they are, and I learned from being around art forever that sometimes the work separates out from the writer and becomes what the readers see in it. Quite a few people said they saw chickens in the future– Bruce said he thought he better start taking testosterone! Ha! I thought that was funny. As always thanks for checking in– Sher

  1. I enjoyed your post. You might care to mull over the fact that roosters (well, in Africa, anyway,) can be sounding the clarion call long before the sun shows up i.e. around 0300 hrs … not always welcome, or enjoyable.

    1. I enjoyed your post. You might care to mull over the fact that roosters (well, in Africa, anyway,) can be sounding the clarion call long before the sun shows up i.e. around 0300 hrs … not always welcome, or enjoyable. Ha! Point well taken Alison! Thanks for the good advice. 🙂 Sher

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